Day 18: Tardajos to Hontanas

For a different start to the day I went across the road to an albergue offering a light breakfast. I heard the news from the tv above my head and understood very little of it. Fast Spanish is not on my list of abilities yet.

The Walk to Hornillos de Camino was interesting as I found myself talking with a very charming Japanese woman who had relatives in Australia and spoke very good English. She was with other family members and they were all very gracious and interested in Where I was from in Australia and my amateur radio hobby. I recalled some words and phrases in Japanese that I had learned some years ago from a small card sent to me by a Japanese radio amateur. Basic stuff like good morning, goodbye, see you again and thank you very much. And some numbers I had used when speaking with Japanese people on the radio. They were impressed that I could remember such words after 30 years. Walking is good for the memory.

I made a birthday call to my grandson Jeremy who turned 20 today. He was with his dad (Mark) and his brother Ben on the beach west of Geelong in Victoria, Australia.

I stopped for some food and juice at Hornbillos de Camino, seeing many walkers go past while I was stopped. Most of them had Started at Burgos that morning so had walked 10km more than I had. They may have set out a bit earlier.

The Walk to Hornillos de Camino was interesting as I found myself talking with a very charming Japanese woman who had relatives in Australia and spoke very good English. She was with other family members and they were all very gracious and interested in my amateur radio hobby. I recalled some words and phrases in Japanese that I had learned some years ago from a small card sent to me by a Japanese radio amateur. Basic stuff like good morning, goodbye, see you again and thank you very much. And some numbers I had used when speaking with Japanese people on the radio. They were impressed that I could remember such words after 30 years. Walking is good for the memory.

After a while the path leads up to the first section of meseta where there is a wide expanse of very flat land. Somewhat featureless but due to the altitude of 900+ metres, it is windy and there are very many wind turbines on the edges of the meseta.

A Japanese team from NHK was making a documentary about the Camino. The group of walkers I had been chatting with earlier was asked to help them by speaking on camera with the interviewers,, walking along sections of the roadway etc so I lost contact with them until later it happened that they also stayed at the same albergue as I did.

I had seen the Japanese tv crew 11 days earlier after leaving Pamplona.

Another section of meseta followed the next town Hornbillos de Camino.

In the middle of the day the light overcast gave way to stronger sunshine with wind. I stopped to apply more sunblock.

I passed a milepost saying 477.7 km to Santiago. That meant it was 300km since leaving St Jean Pied de Port where I started 17 days earlier. See photo below.

At about 20km I decided to stop at Hontanas. The first albergue on the left was chosen and I found a good bed in a room of 8 with its own bathroom and shower. A good arrangement.

Looking back to the east
Pano view
Almost featureless
The photo taken most often
Shocking waste. just a bit more duct tape could have restored these fine shoes and given another few metres of life
477 km to Santiago means 300km walked so far (except for 4km in a taxi)
More meseta. And a cloud.

A hill
Dinner is served. About 600mm diameter, chicken paella
The hungry walkers/pilgrims
The dining area had a restaurant feeling which seemed very special.

3 comments

  1. Andrew

    good to see u r traveling well . Keep it up.
    I am currently in South America heading for Perú now the congress has concluded

    73

    Rik VK3EQ

    Like

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